Gourmet Brined Chicken

CHICKEN, DUCK, PIDGEON, QUAIL, TURKEY ETC
greeny03
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Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 11:19 am

Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by greeny03 » Mon Jul 29, 2013 8:33 pm

Well the Wife was very impressed!! She said she liked the slight saltiness and said she couldn't really taste the curry, although I could and agree with Captain! A subtleness added to the natural taste. I have 1.5kg of wings that I now have been directed to do the same with for tomorrow nights tea!
A big Cudos for the recipe!


2browndogs
Posts: 403
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:42 pm
Location: Melbourne - Bayside

Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by 2browndogs » Thu Aug 01, 2013 7:29 pm

Captain Cook wrote:
joey13 wrote:Hey Phil,

I am hosting my son's 3rd Birthday in about 5 weeks time. Having about 20 people or so.

I have just purchased a Weber Q320 which I plan to cook all of the usual barbecue meats on.

I am in the process of hunting down an old Weber Kettle to have a "Show Piece" meat to cook along side the 320. I'm thinking I might do 2 of these. Can two be done in a kettle at the same time and are there any tips in placement of the meat/coals? How many beads? Position of beads and cooking time/temps?

Another option I'm also thinking about maybe doing 1 chicken and 1 other cut of meat? Any suggestions?

Your help would be much appreciated.

Cheers, Joe.
Joe,
You can fit 2 with ease, 3 with a squeeze, still use 25 beads a side with both vents open.
If you want a truly great beef roast that melts in your mouth, go to woollies and get a couple of classic marinated roast beef - that's the rolled ones not the solid pieces. Cook them to 63C and then close the vents and let them sit in the kettle while itis cooling down then you can put them in the esky to rest or if you still want to cook on the kettle cook them to 65C and the put them in the esky. They will be the most moist and tender bits of beef that you will ever eat. The other thing you can try is a piece of pickled pork from woollies, rinse it a couple of times under fresh water and then cook it to an internal of 75C, baste/glaze it with honey twice during the last 15 - 20 minutes of cooking. - Q Ham.

You can do the chooks on the 320 and put them in the esky after they are cooked.

When you use the esky wrap the meat in foil and then sit it in a foil tray in the esky, put a couple of old towels over the meat and then put the lid on. Apart from allowing the meat to rest for a longtime it stays super hot for about 2 hours so it is lays ready to eat when you are.

Cheers

Captain
Capitano - based on your recommendation of the classic beef from Woolies - I did one last night, in the kettle.
It wasn't bad, but Mrs & I thought it was quite salty, and it tasted a bit like ham. Cooked it to 60, then rested & sliced.

My question is, should i have rinsed all the marinade off before cooking it ? Should I expect it to taste 'hammy' ?

Cheers-Pete

TMAN
Posts: 250
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Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by TMAN » Thu Aug 01, 2013 7:37 pm

Is it possible to brine a chicken and freeze it for later use
Image

Captain Cook
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Location: Melbourne

Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by Captain Cook » Thu Aug 01, 2013 8:20 pm

Pete
Never had that problem with the beef before. Was it the Classic marinated rolled beef. I just throw mine on and cook it until it is well done - never had a problem like you had.

Cheers

Captain

Captain Cook
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Location: Melbourne

Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by Captain Cook » Thu Aug 01, 2013 8:22 pm

TMAN wrote:Is it possible to brine a chicken and freeze it for later use
High salt content - wont freeze. I never use frozen chooks ever. I think that they get a change in texture and taste.

Captain

traveller
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Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by traveller » Thu Aug 01, 2013 9:19 pm

I seem to remember Chris (UG) telling me at his masterclass that brining with acids like Vinegar and Lemon juice was not a good idea. Can anyone confirm this and if so, why?

2browndogs
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Location: Melbourne - Bayside

Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by 2browndogs » Thu Aug 01, 2013 10:36 pm

Captain Cook wrote:Pete
Never had that problem with the beef before. Was it the Classic marinated rolled beef. I just throw mine on and cook it until it is well done - never had a problem like you had.

Cheers

Captain
hey Phil. Yeah it was the classic marinated beef. Rolled in a net. Had a red sauce all over it when opened.

peteru
Posts: 487
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Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by peteru » Fri Aug 02, 2013 3:33 pm

traveller wrote:I seem to remember Chris (UG) telling me at his masterclass that brining with acids like Vinegar and Lemon juice was not a good idea. Can anyone confirm this and if so, why?
It's not a good idea if you are just starting out with brining. Acidic marinades will affect the texture of the meat and can turn it into mush if not used correctly. As an example, if you leave chicken breast in a dill pickling brine for 24 hours, then smoke it, you will end up with meat that has the texture of damp weetbix. The same process done with a 6% salt brine will give you a nice juicy meaty texture.

Acidic marinades are generally best used for a short period of time just before the cook, but there are some exceptions. For example, there is a Czech dish that brines a scotch fillet in a vinegar, herb and vegetable mixture for 3 days, before the meat is roasted.
____________
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symowallo
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Location: Sydney - Inner West

Post by symowallo » Mon Sep 02, 2013 3:31 pm

Did my first two brined chickens this weekend on the 320. First one was stock standard per the Captain's recipe, the second was with 2 small star anise in the brine. Subtle difference but worth it. I also used warm water for the brine the second time so that the salt and sugar would dissolve better (cooled prior to brining though!!)

Best BBQ chicken I have done. Most of the extra flavour is noticeable in the skin folds - ie. Under the wing, between the leg and breast etc. Very impressed, thanks Capitano!! The wife even admitted that it was worth the effort, and she's stubborn.

Now you guys have me wanting to buy a rotisserie set!!!!!

Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk

Barrakooda
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Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by Barrakooda » Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:56 pm

Thanks Captain for recipe got the SWMBO seal of approval!!

Followed recipe for a 5hr soak in brine & refrigerated overnight. Had no butter (SWMBO used last of it for a cake) so brushed it with vegy oil.

Cooked on the Cadac using about half a chimney of Hot Shots lump charcoal. Tried to maintain a temp of 180C using Mav temp gauge (you gota love being able to surf the net, sip on a beer & keep an eye on your dinner ;)). Was very windy during most of the cook so was a challenge. I foiled the edges thinking direct heat might burn bird but could have done without them I think. Cooked to 83C thigh/77 breast

The skin seem to separate from meat not sure if I like that, but tbh the chook almost could be pulled apart by hand! So tender. I think I should have let the kettle run at a higher temp for 1/2hr or so or use butter to coat the bird. Have hickory in the shed but junior SWMBO isn't to keen on smoking (work in progress).

End result:

Image

serial griller
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Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by serial griller » Thu Nov 14, 2013 1:09 am

Hi everybody this is my first post. This is a beautiful site. I would like to ask a couple of questions regarding the recipe. Am located in Cyprus and our grilling tradition and habits are strong but we use different a different type of bbq than most of you guys. Our favorites include pork butt/lamp in fist size pieces skewered aka "Souvla" (see photos)

PORK BUTT AND CHICKEN POTATOES AND VEGS
Image

Image

We are not using complex marinades nor sugary ingredients usually just the traditional Mediterranean stuff such as olive oil, lemon, oregano and of course salt. The skewers are approx 20cm from the charcoal and rotating quite fast. As the height is adjustable some people lower the meat towards the end for crispier results.

My question is weather the Captain's recipe could be reproduced with success using an uncovered bbq such as the above. The chicken will be trussed of course and put on the rotisserie. My own personal recipe for a whole chicken (not in pieces such as the above in photo) which i regularly cook doesn't involve brining, simply just a lemon olive oil rub down and salt/ bay leaf in the cavity. My guess maybe the bird to be covered in alu foil? or maybe not i don't know.

So thanks for your time spent reading and thanks in advance for any help.

Be all good now

SG

Captain Cook
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Location: Melbourne

Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by Captain Cook » Thu Nov 14, 2013 8:06 am

Welcome to the forum SG
Great to have international members join in - cultural exchange and all that.

My Gourmet Brined Chicken works extremely well on a rotisserie covered or uncovered doesn't matter. I do it on my Weber Kettle Rotisserie sometimes. The cooking time varies with the method that you use. We always cook to internal temperature not time. I always cook it to between 77 and 83 C, the chicken will still be very moist. You may find that the meat next to the bone has some redness to it, this is because of the salt from the brining process drawing out the juices from the bone during the cooking process. It actually adds flavour to the chicken - like the meat next to the bone in a T-bone steak.

I suggest that you rotisserie the chicken for an hour then check the internal temperature, my guess is that you will need about another 10 minutes.

Brining also works with other meats, check out the brining posts in " food science , BBQ techniques and tips" in the forum.

Cheers

Captain

serial griller
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Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 12:34 am

Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by serial griller » Thu Nov 14, 2013 5:17 pm

Good morning captain and thanks for the welcoming. More or less i figured that being uncovered is not really an issue unless i need to smoke the meat. I will do 2 chickens, 1 whole and one in pieces. The one in pieces will be brined for 2-3 hours and the whole as instructed.

Will post back my results.

thanks again

chrisg
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Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by chrisg » Sat Nov 16, 2013 9:52 am

:)

That was a long and very worthwhile read :)

I asked a mate who is an industrial chemist about osmosis and brine, you know what he said?

"Now you know the secret of my BBQ chicken." ;)

Given he does the best chook on a bbq I've ever tasted I'm sold, been promised a two or so year old bird next week, prefer them that sort of age tbh but do need to be tenderised a bit and cooked slow, shall do it in brine and see how it comes up, delish I'm sure :)

I must admit the amount of salt in the original recipe had me cringe a bit, but as the thread progressed it seems that a tablespoon per litre is preferred. My chemist mate says that is about what he uses and that the salt, as UG explained is not so much there to add saltiness, essentially it's the transport and tenderiser, which makes sense.

Don't like ziplocks much though, will find my Tupperware meat holder somewhere in this mess called just-moved-house :)

Cheers and thanks :)

Smokey
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Location: Terranora- Tweed

Re: Gourmet Brined Chicken

Post by Smokey » Sun Nov 17, 2013 11:22 am

Good stuff Chris,
I often use more than one tbsp of salt if I want to do a short brine of say. 4 - 6 hours
So things can be altered to suit your immediate needs.
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