Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

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Smokey
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Re: Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

Post by Smokey » Wed Apr 30, 2014 12:10 am

Coop,
For a small but thick steak like a scotch fillet, Give it a light peppering on both sides.
Then spread a tea spoon or two, more like two, of salt and press it down, Turn over and do same to other side.
It don't really matter what salt but I use sea salt or David's Kosher.
I like to use Kosher flake salt because it just behaves well.
I've also used fancy ground pink salt when feeling frisky
The trick, Is how long to leave it. It can easily over brine the meat.
So for an average Scotch I'd say around 30-40 minutes. But better to start low and work up as you get used to the process.
Rinse it all off and reapply pepper and oil if you want but No more salt or salty rubs.
If you want a certain rub flavour, add some of that in the first step.
The crust you get when doing this is a bonus.
I'd not leave overnight after brining, It's a do and cook job.
If trees screamed when we cut them down, We wouldn't. If they screamed all the time we would.
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Tasmaniac65
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Location: "The Shire" Sydney

Re: Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

Post by Tasmaniac65 » Wed Apr 30, 2014 10:17 am

Thanks Mick,
I am certainly up for it as much as the Boss will think i am going mad AGAIN, she thinks I play far too much with my meat and should just get on with it.
I am most surprised by the small amount of salt that seems to have a big effect in a short period of time, look forward to trying it out tonight and will try to cut one test piece for comparison, cheers
Coop

Buccaneer
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Re: Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

Post by Buccaneer » Wed Apr 30, 2014 12:35 pm

Tasmaniac65 wrote:I am going to try this tomorrow night, my final annoying question is how much Salt is a liberal amount or as in recent post heavily salted? a pic would be great :oops:
and how coarse does the salt need to be to be most effective?
Cheers
Coop
It's not the coarseness that is effective in the process, but the timing I think.
Salt is hydroscopic.
What's happening is, it draws moisture from withing the meat and also the atmosphere and it beads on and around the salt.
So larger particles may help in not pooling too much, or that may not be true either.
Either way, the saltier moisture is then drawn into the meat where the outer layers of meat become thickened due to the sodium ions and so on bonding inside the protein sheath strands.
This forms a blockage in a sense, and osmosis quits working.
From then on I think diffusion is the main player, the salt working slowly past the swollen outer layers.
Heat opens the floodgate and suddenly there is deep penetration, again, through diffusion, not osmosis.
That is what I theorize anyway.

So why does it work, this lack of a tub of brine yet the meat taste juicier and be plumper when we eat?
Well, for dry brining rather than introduce a lot of extra water molecules, you reintroduce the same molecules, and sometimes a tiny bit extra from the atmosphere(if salting on the table rather than in the fridge, I point out), so it isn't the extra water.
The answer is, the process of the ions present in the salt that cause the moisture in the meat to bind and not release as it is cooked.It also prevents muscle fibres from squeezing, which expels moisture by force.
End result is a natural juicier piece of steak, that tastes like steakier than steak steak.
HTH
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Tasmaniac65
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Location: "The Shire" Sydney

Re: Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

Post by Tasmaniac65 » Wed Apr 30, 2014 9:37 pm

I have just consumed my first Dry Brine and the results are:
Firslty the visual difference of the meat after the Brine was quite apparent it was much firmer and looked like a better quality piece of meat.
The result of cooking well I can say yes that 30 min in Salt did give a nice flavour through the steaks and added to the crust slightly, sadly that was the end of the good news. I obviously chose a very very budget piece of Scotch as the steaks were quite tough and hard to cut with strong sinew layers.
Good news was that even Management said it would be worth trying on our normal steaks (AAA Angus Grain Fed Rump) to see the resulting difference.

Funniest part was my ten year old son who we call "Mr Fussy" actually quite enjoyed the meal, kids? go figure...

Buccaneer
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Re: Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

Post by Buccaneer » Thu May 01, 2014 12:03 am

It's no magic wand.
2015 Smokin In The City-Boarshank Redemption
Buccaneer, BeachBums, Alimac23, SilentBob!

Smokey
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 5:47 pm
Location: Terranora- Tweed

Re: Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

Post by Smokey » Thu May 01, 2014 1:07 am

But your on the right path :wink:
It's a good technique to improve any steak.
Though, some grass fed stuff just don't need it.
I find most good grain fed beef soft and tender, But a little bland so I'd give the AAA Angus the treatment for sure.
Glad you gave it a try, It's just another arrow in your quiver.
If trees screamed when we cut them down, We wouldn't. If they screamed all the time we would.
http://www.aussiecue.com.au

Tasmaniac65
Posts: 453
Joined: Wed Oct 13, 2010 10:07 pm
Location: "The Shire" Sydney

Re: Brining/Cooking Beef Scotch Fillet piece?

Post by Tasmaniac65 » Thu May 01, 2014 8:20 am

Cheers Mick,
Have some beautiful Pork Chops in wet brine for tonight that will please the family they always taste great.
Coop


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