Smoked Fish

This forum is reserved for "What did you cook posts" and "Pizza Porn". Only post in the current Topics.
Post Reply
Gumb

Smoked Fish

Post by Gumb » Tue May 10, 2011 9:30 pm

Tonight I tried smoking some salmon and rockling, which is something we've done a lot of in the hooded gas BBQ, not so much in the Weber. I used the same temp as I did in the barby (150 C) and because they were just cutlets from the local, they didn't need more than 20 minutes. I put some hickory in the slider after the fish went in (how good is that gadget) and she smoked all the way through the cook. The fish was sensational, and more moist than in the barby. I put them on the top rack with a foil tray on the bottom rack underneath so it was an indirect cook. I really liked the rockling, which usually doesn't take up any smoke in the barby but it certainly did this time. Not too much, but just enough to impart a really great flavour.

We've got some apples from the neighbour's tree so we're now doing an apple crumble at 190C. It couldn't believe how the Kamado sat on the desired 150 for the fish and then went to 190 within 2 minutes of me opening the top vent. That's quicker than our electric oven would have gone up ! I closed the top vent to half way the vent and it's now sitting at 190 without a problem.

I said it before but how good are these beasts ?


bodgy
Posts: 827
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:53 am
Location: Lake Macquarie

Re: Smoked Fish

Post by bodgy » Wed May 11, 2011 7:29 am

Gumb, did you brine the fish and what's a slider?
Bodgy

ImageImageImage

Gumb

Re: Smoked Fish

Post by Gumb » Wed May 11, 2011 10:19 am

I didn't think I'd need to brine something which has lived in salt water all it's life ? :lol:

Seriously though, no we didn't have time for brining and I've never thought of it much, except for pork but it's something I'll definitely have a crack at soon. Does it make much difference to fish though ? Salmon really takes up a lot of flavour in just 20 minutes and even though it's a great smokey taste, it can be too much sometimes. We cooked a bit of both salmon and rockling but I prefer the rockling, it's not quite as harsh. The 'slider' is just my name for the wood chip feeder which came with the Royal.

cheers,

Captain Cook
Posts: 3965
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 11:49 am
Location: Melbourne

Re: Smoked Fish

Post by Captain Cook » Wed May 11, 2011 1:47 pm

Gumb wrote:I didn't think I'd need to brine something which has lived in salt water all it's life ? :lol:

Seriously though, no we didn't have time for brining and I've never thought of it much, except for pork but it's something I'll definitely have a crack at soon. Does it make much difference to fish though ? Salmon really takes up a lot of flavour in just 20 minutes and even though it's a great smokey taste, it can be too much sometimes. We cooked a bit of both salmon and rockling but I prefer the rockling, it's not quite as harsh. The 'slider' is just my name for the wood chip feeder which came with the Royal.

cheers,
Salmon does exceptionally well by being brined in a mixture of 1 Tablespoon of Salt and 1 Tablespoon of Sugar to 1 Litre of water. I prefer to use brown sugar. I brine the Salmon for 2 hours. The brining adds a different dimension to the finish. The brining also helps to retain the mositure and stop it from drying out. I generally do Cedar Planked Salmon which is done on a higher heat and takes 12 minutes

Check out these posts, I think you will find them extremely interesting. http://www.cookshack.com/brining-101 - Smokin Oakie is a member of this forum and is a nioteable expert on the US BBQ scene, and this one viewtopic.php?f=19&t=73

Cheers

Gumb

Re: Smoked Fish

Post by Gumb » Wed May 11, 2011 6:22 pm

Many thanks Phil, I've printed out the brining article which is very detailed.

cheers,
G

sosman
Posts: 1337
Joined: Sun Dec 05, 2010 9:31 am
Location: Melbourne - east

Re: Smoked Fish

Post by sosman » Wed May 11, 2011 7:49 pm

Although I haven't tried it myself, apparently the brining can get rid of the white slime (albumen that can appear, maybe that doesn't apply at 150 C cooking though.
Image

Card Shark
Posts: 1240
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:10 pm
Location: Gold Coast, QLD
Contact:

Re: Smoked Fish

Post by Card Shark » Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:37 pm

Brining can definitely make a big difference. Many books and processes are out there. The following site lists both relatively simply, and a couple of very good custom brines too... http://www.3men.com/threemen1.htm

Haven't tried salmon in Australia but have done local (Gold Coast) Spanish and spotted mackerel with good success with this recipe from the 2007 Eggtoberfest event.

Maple and Dill Brine.
Brine
. 1 LTR water
. 2 TBS kosher salt
. 2 TBS real maple syrup
. 1 TBS brown sugar
. 1 bunch fresh dill, coarsely chopped (about 1/ 2 cup)
. 3 cloves garlic, smashed
. ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
. 2 LBs fish fillets

Directions:
. Combine the water, salt, maple syrup and brown sugar in a large non reactive (glass) container.
. Stir to dissolve the salt.
. Add dill, garlic, and pepper.
. Submerge the fish skin side up in the brine.
. Cover the container and refrigerate for 8 to 10 hours.

To cook:
. Remove the fish from the brine and pat dry.
. Brush or spray with oil.
. To grill, put on a sheet of foil directly on the grill rack over medium heat (350-400 degrees F) for
about 10 minutes per inch of thickness.
Last edited by Card Shark on Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:36 am, edited 2 times in total.

Gumb

Re: Smoked Fish

Post by Gumb » Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:28 am

That looks like one for me to pass on to the other half. :) Thanks for the info.

She can do all the preparation and I'll have a beer while cooking it. Sounds fair to me. :)


Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests