Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

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damianpyro
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by damianpyro » Sun Aug 02, 2015 11:13 am

Why no sugar, I thought you needed sugar to "feed" the yeast?


Bentley
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by Bentley » Sun Aug 02, 2015 1:36 pm

I always "bloom" my yeast with some sugar, but I don't always follow directions correctly too!
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Narmnaleg
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by Narmnaleg » Sun Aug 02, 2015 3:06 pm

damianpyro wrote:Why no sugar, I thought you needed sugar to "feed" the yeast?
You don't. Yeast will happily feed on flour.

urbangriller
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by urbangriller » Mon Aug 03, 2015 8:26 pm

Narmnaleg wrote:
damianpyro wrote:Why no sugar, I thought you needed sugar to "feed" the yeast?
You don't. Yeast will happily feed on flour.
Yep, Enzymes break the starch into simple sugars that feed the yeast (and makes alcohol), it's a slower process, but slow fermentation means better tasting bread.....cold water works better than warm for the same reason.

Cheers
Chris
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sosman
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by sosman » Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:20 pm

urbangriller wrote:
Narmnaleg wrote:
damianpyro wrote:Why no sugar, I thought you needed sugar to "feed" the yeast?
You don't. Yeast will happily feed on flour.
Yep, Enzymes break the starch into simple sugars that feed the yeast (and makes alcohol), it's a slower process, but slow fermentation means better tasting bread.....cold water works better than warm for the same reason.

Cheers
Chris
From where I sit in my comfy armchair I am not completely satisfied with that answer. I headed over to wolfram alpha (http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=wheat+flour) and it shows that wheat flour contains quite a bit of sugar. While I don't reject the idea totally of enzymes (such as alpha and beta amylase) breaking down simple starches (as in mashing barley to create wort prior fermentation) - my best bet is that the yeast gets right to work on the sugar already present.

IIRC alpha amylase works best around 64 C which is too hot for yeast so maybe there is not even any secondary break down of starch into sugar when proofing yeast.
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niko123456
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Post by niko123456 » Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:43 pm

Not sure how you interpret less than 1g of sugar per 100g as "quite a bit".

niko123456
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Post by niko123456 » Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:54 pm

Also, mashing grain is not done with yeast, so I don't think there is much of a comparison there.

sosman
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Re:

Post by sosman » Tue Aug 04, 2015 10:21 pm

niko123456 wrote:Not sure how you interpret less than 1g of sugar per 100g as "quite a bit".
Fair point - maybe enough.
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sosman
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Re:

Post by sosman » Tue Aug 04, 2015 10:23 pm

niko123456 wrote:Also, mashing grain is not done with yeast, so I don't think there is much of a comparison there.
The point wasn't that you mash with yeast, my point was that to prepare the wort for action by the yeast you mash it, ie the enzyme action is applied prior to introducing the yeast.
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niko123456
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Post by niko123456 » Tue Aug 04, 2015 10:54 pm

No, but I think i mean if you had the enzymes that were available in yeast you wouldn't need water at 68'C to convert starch into simple sugars.

sosman
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Re:

Post by sosman » Tue Aug 04, 2015 11:02 pm

niko123456 wrote:No, but I think i mean if you had the enzymes that were available in yeast you wouldn't need water at 68'C to convert starch into simple sugars.
Like I said earlier, I'm not saying the enzyme theory is wrong, I am just looking for a simpler explanation. If someone digs out a reference to enzymes found in flour that work at room temperature then I'm a believer.
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urbangriller
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by urbangriller » Fri Aug 07, 2015 9:03 pm

Have a read of this boys:

http://www.biokemi.org/biozoom/issues/516/articles/2309

Some high temp Amylase only act during baking to stop stalling and create high volume loaves....but there are others, each with its own party trick.

Interesting science.

Think of the activity you get in a sourdough starter after a few days with just flour and water, not even yeast, just amazing!

Cheers
Chris
Common Sense is so rare these days it should be a Super Power!

BeachedBro
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Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by BeachedBro » Sat Jan 02, 2016 5:17 pm

Used the method in this thread to make pizza last night in a my mother in laws wood fired oven.

Only had 2 problems and I think I figured it out in the end. First up its summer and I took all my dough portions out of the fridge at same time. The first pizza was really easy to manage but I made it too thin in the middle. I got it in the oven and noticed the temp dropping. The oven was around 400 c just before but the surface was obviously colder as the pizza wasn't cooking fast enough. When I tired to move it the centre broke and I made a mess of oven floor. I saved it by folding it in half and making a calzone Lol.

I then decided to the get the oven hotter and clean the floor so moved the hot coals over the messy area from my failed attempt. Got the fire going again real hot. Moved it over and waited a little longer. By this time the dough had been out for over an 1.5 and I noticed it was a springing back badly every time I tried to make a base.

Anyway the remaining pizza were still amazing but I learnt a lot for my next attempt in a few days time.

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cumagutsa
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by cumagutsa » Mon Apr 03, 2017 5:15 pm

IfI wanted to freeze the dough balls at what stage would I do it?
And would you wrap them is cling wrap to freeze or put them in separate containers?

cheers Darren

Groovy Gorilla
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Re: Authentic Italian Pizza Dough Recipe Instructions

Post by Groovy Gorilla » Fri Apr 07, 2017 9:26 am

I use snap lock bags and freeze before rise
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