Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Charcoal cookers (such as Weber Kettles)
eXpeLL
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:35 pm

Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by eXpeLL » Tue Mar 03, 2015 8:20 pm

I have a Kamado Joe classic and have been using Gidgee lump exclusively for all my cooks. I've just ordered a pit temp controller and was wondering what lump I should b using for low and slow. As I understand With regards to heat produced, from hot to hottest it goes something like Mallee stick and branch, Mallee root, Red Gum then Gidgee. Obviously all of these products would be suitable for low and slow cooking (I've done all my overnights guy low and slow with Gidgee thus far). Was wondering if I should use different lump for low and slow vs high temp cooks. I do understand that different charcoal have a slight difference in taste profile and then there is also difference in ash produced. Although I haven't had any problems with ash inhibiting air flow with Gidgee, this is something I was thinking may cause problems. I was wondering if anyone uses different charcoal for different cooks and why? Sorry if this has been covered before but couldn't find it with a Google search.

E

Edit: Posted before I finished typing on the iPhone. Damn fat fingers.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Card Shark
Posts: 1240
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:10 pm
Location: Gold Coast, QLD
Contact:

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by Card Shark » Tue Mar 03, 2015 8:31 pm

Who ever has the best deal with "hardwood" charcoal as the primary fuel such as the ones for-mentioned, go with that. Longer cooks, even temps, with stoker over night = plenty of sleep. Here's a native timber matrix to marry up chunks to add and enhance almost anything. http://www.aussiebbq.info/forum/viewtop ... &start=225

Gumb

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by Gumb » Tue Mar 03, 2015 9:48 pm

Red gum produces almost no ash, gidgee is hotter and does produce ash. Talk to Terry at Aussie BBQ Smoke - he is the guru :)

eXpeLL
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:35 pm

Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by eXpeLL » Tue Mar 03, 2015 10:33 pm

Thanks for the response guys. Gumb, it was your response to my post in Wangs vendor section about ash/dust that got me thinking about this issue with regards to a pit temp controller utilizing s blower/fan (didn't want to hijack that thread so posted this here).
For instance I have noticed lots of ash with Gidgee. In an overnight cook with Gidgee once the temp dips and the fan is activated, is it going to blow ash all over my meat? If that's the case then a cleaner burning charcoal would be desirable. I suspect that it doesn't make much difference otherwise I would have read about it already?
My other thought was if the price/kg of the different charcoal was the same then is it likely that using Gidgee would be more economical as it produces more heat? Or does it burn hotter cause if burns faster? Again I suppose the difference is negligible otherwise someone would have pointed it out?
Last point/question, am I taking this Charcoal BBQ thing too seriously now or is everyone here as crazy as I (and my wife) think I am?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Gumb

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by Gumb » Wed Mar 04, 2015 5:49 am

:D I thinkyou are over complicating it :D the blower won't blow ash on the food, I've never found that to be the case. When you choke down the fire to maintain a steady temp, like 110c, it doesn't really matter if you are burning gidgee or red gum. 110c is what you get. Maybe red gum burns a bit more to achieve the same amount of heat but I doubt that you'd notice it, charcoal in a Kamado is very cheap anyway.

yakabot
Posts: 621
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2012 5:40 pm

Post by yakabot » Wed Mar 04, 2015 6:50 am

A blower doesn't really blow hard like a hair dryer. It's just supplying the air the coals need. The airflow wouldn't really be any greater than anything with its intake vents open. The coals draw air in to keep burning. The blower just sort of stops that and let's some in when needed.
I must state that i don't have one yet, but in the process of ordering bits to make one.
I'd hazard a guess that the airflow would not be any stronger than what you can feel at the back of a computer where the psu exhausts air. Wouldn't even blow a match out, but would be enough to keep coals going.

eXpeLL
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:35 pm

Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by eXpeLL » Wed Mar 04, 2015 12:09 pm

yakabot wrote:A blower doesn't really blow hard like a hair dryer. It's just supplying the air the coals need.
Haha. That's the image in my mind about what would happen. Have used an old hairdryer technique a few times to speed up the heating for Pizza's which blows dust and ash through the top vent like an exploding volcano. Given the amount of ash I get at the end of a low and slow in the ash tool (almost full) I was a bit worried. Didn't want my next pulled pork tasting like an ashtray ;)
E


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Gumb

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by Gumb » Wed Mar 04, 2015 5:49 pm

The blower puts in a lot more than just having the events open but not enough to blow ash around. If you get a Q Master Senior you can adjust the maximum airflow of the fan.

eXpeLL
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:35 pm

Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by eXpeLL » Sun Mar 08, 2015 8:52 pm

Thanks Gumb. May need some advice when I get my hands on it. Seems you've used it for a while now.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

2browndogs
Posts: 403
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:42 pm
Location: Melbourne - Bayside

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by 2browndogs » Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:12 pm

I've found the redgum lump hard to use for low/slows - tends to go out for some reason

eXpeLL
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:35 pm

Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by eXpeLL » Tue Mar 10, 2015 8:18 pm

2browndogs wrote:I've found the redgum lump hard to use for low/slows - tends to go out for some reason
Sounds like I might stick to Gidgee then. Thought about looking into Redgum as I thought less ash was in some way better.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

2browndogs
Posts: 403
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:42 pm
Location: Melbourne - Bayside

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by 2browndogs » Tue Mar 10, 2015 10:48 pm

Less ash is definitely better. The redgum lump has a much more pleasant 'nose' - and is fine for general cooking

kenshinzero
Posts: 20
Joined: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:54 pm

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by kenshinzero » Wed Mar 11, 2015 9:36 am

2browndogs wrote:I've found the redgum lump hard to use for low/slows - tends to go out for some reason
After many cooks with the red gum lump i have found that no matter how much you use if it is not in a pile its not going to burn to combat this when i do an overnight cook i will drop some heat beads at the bottom unlit so when the redgum pile eventually burns out the heatbeads stop it from extinguishing

WarmBeer
Posts: 133
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 3:43 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by WarmBeer » Sun Aug 30, 2015 10:00 am

2browndogs wrote:I've found the redgum lump hard to use for low/slows - tends to go out for some reason
Found this out first hand yesterday when trying to do some ribs in my Dragon. Ended up using the gas smoker instead, so proof that you can never have too many barbecues.

Any other ideas on how to use redgum charcoal for low'n'slow? Or should I just do a whole lot of pizzas for the next couple of months?
Dragon Kamado | Weber OTS | Hark (Aldi) Smoker | Rusty Gasser

Muppet
Posts: 405
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 4:50 pm
Location: Wild West

Type of charcoal for low and slow vs. high temp cooking.

Post by Muppet » Sun Aug 30, 2015 10:36 am

I've done many many low and slows using red gum and have never had it go out? It's the only charcoal available to me so I've always used it. Don't know what else to add here it's just not a problem I've ever come across. For a long cook I'll stack it in a pyramid shape with the larger bits at the bottom finer stuff on the top and then light the top. Give it plenty of air to start with then start creeping to temp around 30F below target. Set up this way my Kamado holds 225 for 20+hrs with the occasional small adjustment. Is it possible you snuffed the fire out?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Baby steps...
Current Weaponry - Saffire Kamado, Treager Junior, Outdoorchef 57, Performer 46, 'Fooseball' Grill, Hibachi


Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests